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17+ Short Eulogy Examples: How to Write a Eulogy

For the majority of us, writing and giving a eulogy is something we have no experience of, and therefore we may find it difficult to know where to start. There is no right or wrong way to compose a eulogy; each is as unique as the person giving it and the person it describes, whether that be a eulogy for a best friend or your fathers eulogy. It should however be positive, no more than 5-10 minutes, and if spoken from the heart be memorable and moving for all concerned.


Short Eulogy Examples

A Loving Mother: Eulogy Examples to a Mother

An eulogy for a mother should include loving memories. We have dedicated a page that provides examples of eulogies written for a mother.

Dedicated Father: Eulogy Examples to a Dad

Our eulogy examples for a father convey a man of strength and family values.

The Best Friend: Eulogy Examples to a Best Friend

You shared the best memories and so the eulogies shared have a mixture of emotion and humour to honour a lost friend.

I Miss You, Brother: Eulogy Examples to Brother

A lifelong bond between siblings is a theme shown in our eulogy examples for a brother.

A Beautiful Daughter: Eulogy Examples to a Daughter

Read these examples of eulogies to daughters to help find words to celebrate and mourn your darling daughter.

My Husband: Eulogy Examples to a Husband

Find some suitable worlds in these examples to help you honour and say goodbye to your fallen husband.

My Sole Mate: Eulogy Examples to a Wife

Fitting tributes to a lost wife to help show your everlasting love and affection.

Goodbye Grandfather: Eulogy Examples to Grandfather

Oftentimes grandparents play a vital role teaching lessons and sharing memories.

You Were Always There for Me: Eulogy Examples to a Grandmother

Fitting words are hard to find, read our examples to help say goodbye to your grandmother.

Tips on How to Write a Eulogy

We have spoken to 5 professional Eulogy writers to get their tips to help you create the most fitting eulogy.

  1. Gather Your Material

  2. Firstly, as you write down all your thoughts and feelings of the deceased, gather as much information from close family and friends, as well as their old acquaintances from work or even school as you can. They will hopefully be able to add to your own memories and stories.

    Writing a eulogy does not have to be done totally by yourself, getting others to contribute like this, not only helps you, but will make others feel like they are contributing, and may help them with their grieving too.

    Looking at old photographs can jog the memory, reliving old times, old places, old achievements.

  3. Pick a Theme, Avoid Chronological Lists and Be Upbeat

  4. Rather than listing events in chronological order, focus points based around achievements and a theme. Was the person always happy, were they the life and soul, a quiet and kind person or just someone you could rely on.

    By picking out a central theme, this helps focus all short stories you might recite and allows the eulogy to flow, rather than simply reading a list of dry facts.

    Explore moments and memories that touched you and try to group those thoughts together to create some kind of structure.

  5. Slow down, express yourself and be open

  6. By slowing down your speech, you give yoursel to thin kand the audience to follow along. Dont rush through it to get it over with.

    Deliver the speech by expressing emotions and varying tones in your voice. Avoid a monotone delivery.

    An open body language will help the audience connect with you.

  7. Give Yourself Time to Write and Practice

  8. Allow yourself the time and emotional space to experience the process. It’s a writing process, but it’s an emotional process, too. Allow yourself that grace as you write; you will need it as you recall memories and stories about times spent with your loved one who has now passed on.

    Once you have a draft, give yourself time to practice aloud.

  9. Read Examples

We have provided a number of eulogy examples above, so take time to read and watch them to get a feel of how you would like to recite the finals words.

Please do not try to copy or imitate anyone though, some people are naturally better or more experienced at speaking in public so just do you, be personable and speak from the heart.

Eulogy Template

Whilst I do not recommend the use of a eulogy template approach when writing an eulogy, I understand it might help some people. Below i have drafted 2 versions.

The first one is just an idea of things you could include and a basic outline.

The second is a ‘fill in the blank’ type template. Please don’t use this word for word and just use it to help you with some ideas.

Frequently Asked Eulogy Questions

How do you start an Eulogy?

I start by acknowledging key mourners (close family etc) so that they know they are included.
This part makes it easier for the reader to start the eulogy as they move the attention away from themselves and the person they have lost to a third party.

What should you avoid saying in an Eulogy?

  • Cause of death

  • Personal Faults

  • Any personal or professional Grudges

  • Past arguments/family disputes

  • Unhealthy addictions

  • Prior Convinctions

  • Bad treatment of people

  • Bad decisions

  • Any Emotional baggage

  • Embarrassing or Inappropriate stories

  • Adult humor

  • Justifying the loss

  • Anything youhave to thik twice about

Who traditionally does the Eulogy?

Eulogies are traditional read by the next of kin but can be read by anyone. Friends, close family or professional callegues. The person leading the ceremony may also be asked to speak if no one can face talking.